Combat-ready kitchen: how the U.S. military shapes the way you eat

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Americans eat more processed foods than anyone else in the world. We also spend more on military research. These two seemingly unrelated facts are inextricably linked. If you ever wondered how ready-to-eat foods infiltrated your kitchen, you'll love this entertaining romp through the secret military history of practically everything you buy at the supermarket. In a nondescript Boston suburb, in a handful of low buildings buffered by trees and a lake, a group of men and women spend their days researching, testing, tasting, and producing the foods that form the bedrock of the American diet. If you stumbled into the facility, you might think the technicians dressed in lab coats and the shiny kitchen equipment belonged to one of the giant food conglomerates responsible for your favorite brand of frozen pizza or microwavable breakfast burritos. So you'd be surprised to learn that you've just entered the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Systems Center, ground zero for the processed food industry. Ever since Napoleon, armies have sought better ways to preserve, store, and transport food for battle. As part of this quest, although most people don't realize it, the U.S. military spearheaded the invention of energy bars, restructured meat, extended-life bread, instant coffee, and much more. But there's been an insidious mission creep: because the military enlisted industry—huge corporations such as ADM, ConAgra, General Mills, Hershey, Hormel, Mars, Nabisco, Reynolds, Smithfield, Swift, Tyson, and Unilever—to help develop and manufacture food for soldiers on the front line, over the years combat rations, or the key technologies used in engineering them, have ended up dominating grocery store shelves and refrigerator cases. TV dinners, the cheese powder in snack foods, cling wrap . . . The list is almost endless. Now food writer Anastacia Marx de Salcedo scrutinizes the world of processed food and its long relationship with the military—unveiling the twists, turns, successes, failures, and products that have found their way from the armed forces' and contractors' laboratories into our kitchens. In developing these rations, the army was looking for some of the very same qualities as we do in our hectic, fast-paced twenty-first-century lives: portability, ease of preparation, extended shelf life at room temperature, affordability, and appeal to even the least adventurous eaters. In other words, the military has us chowing down like special ops. What is the effect of such a diet, eaten—as it is by soldiers and most consumers—day in and day out, year after year? We don't really know. We're the guinea pigs in a giant public health experiment, one in which science and technology, at the beck and call of the military, have taken over our kitchens. From the Hardcover edition.
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9781591845973
9781494593865
9781101601648
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Grouped Work ID3ed32dc9-0577-9043-446e-5702ece333f7
Grouping Titlecombat ready kitchen how the u s military shapes the way you eat
Grouping Authoranastacia marx de salcedo
Grouping Categorybook
Grouping LanguageEnglish (eng)
Last Grouping Update2022-12-03 20:02:02PM
Last Indexed2022-12-04 21:19:58PM

Solr Fields

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0
accelerated_reader_reading_level
0
auth_author2
Cooney, C. S. E.
Cooney, C.S.E.
author
Marx de Salcedo, Anastacia
author2-role
Cooney, C. S. E.|Narrator
Cooney, C.S.E
hoopla digital
author_display
Marx de Salcedo, Anastacia
available_at_bemis
Bemis Public Library
detailed_location_bemis
Bemis Lower Level
display_description
Americans eat more processed foods than anyone else in the world. We also spend more on military research. These two seemingly unrelated facts are inextricably linked. If you ever wondered how ready-to-eat foods infiltrated your kitchen, you'll love this entertaining romp through the secret military history of practically everything you buy at the supermarket. In a nondescript Boston suburb, in a handful of low buildings buffered by trees and a lake, a group of men and women spend their days researching, testing, tasting, and producing the foods that form the bedrock of the American diet. If you stumbled into the facility, you might think the technicians dressed in lab coats and the shiny kitchen equipment belonged to one of the giant food conglomerates responsible for your favorite brand of frozen pizza or microwavable breakfast burritos. So you'd be surprised to learn that you've just entered the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Systems Center, ground zero for the processed food industry. Ever since Napoleon, armies have sought better ways to preserve, store, and transport food for battle. As part of this quest, although most people don't realize it, the U.S. military spearheaded the invention of energy bars, restructured meat, extended-life bread, instant coffee, and much more. But there's been an insidious mission creep: because the military enlisted industry—huge corporations such as ADM, ConAgra, General Mills, Hershey, Hormel, Mars, Nabisco, Reynolds, Smithfield, Swift, Tyson, and Unilever—to help develop and manufacture food for soldiers on the front line, over the years combat rations, or the key technologies used in engineering them, have ended up dominating grocery store shelves and refrigerator cases. TV dinners, the cheese powder in snack foods, cling wrap . . . The list is almost endless. Now food writer Anastacia Marx de Salcedo scrutinizes the world of processed food and its long relationship with the military—unveiling the twists, turns, successes, failures, and products that have found their way from the armed forces' and contractors' laboratories into our kitchens. In developing these rations, the army was looking for some of the very same qualities as we do in our hectic, fast-paced twenty-first-century lives: portability, ease of preparation, extended shelf life at room temperature, affordability, and appeal to even the least adventurous eaters. In other words, the military has us chowing down like special ops. What is the effect of such a diet, eaten—as it is by soldiers and most consumers—day in and day out, year after year? We don't really know. We're the guinea pigs in a giant public health experiment, one in which science and technology, at the beck and call of the military, have taken over our kitchens. From the Hardcover edition.
format_bemis
Book
eAudiobook
format_category_bemis
Audio Books
Books
eBook
id
3ed32dc9-0577-9043-446e-5702ece333f7
isbn
9781101601648
9781494593865
9781591845973
itype_bemis
Juvenile Biography
last_indexed
2022-12-05T04:19:58.944Z
lexile_score
-1
literary_form
Non Fiction
literary_form_full
Non Fiction
local_callnumber_bemis
394.12 DE-SALCE
owning_library_bemis
Bemis Public Library
owning_location_bemis
Bemis Public Library
primary_isbn
9781591845973
publishDate
2015
publisher
Current, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC
Tantor Audio
Tantor Media, Inc
recordtype
grouped_work
subject_facet
Business
Cooking & Food
Diet -- United States
Electronic books
Engineering
Food habits -- United States
Food industry and trade -- Government policy -- United States
Nonfiction
Nutrition policy -- United States
Sociology
Technology
title_display
Combat-ready kitchen : how the U.S. military shapes the way you eat
title_full
Combat-ready kitchen : how the U.S. military shapes the way you eat / Anastacia Marx de Salcedo
Combat-ready kitchen : how the U.S. military shapes the way you eat [electronic resource] / Anastacia Marx de Salcedo
Combat-ready kitchen [electronic resource] : How the u.s. military shapes the way you eat. Anastacia Marx de Salcedo
title_short
Combat-ready kitchen
title_sub
how the U.S. military shapes the way you eat
topic_facet
Business
Cooking & Food
Diet
Engineering
Food habits
Food industry and trade
Government policy
Nonfiction
Nutrition policy
Sociology
Technology

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overdrivecmc:ODN0002148070ODN0002148070Overdrive (CMC)Online Overdrive (CMC)eBookeBook1falsetrueOverdrive (CMC)http://link.overdrive.com/?websiteID=162&titleID=2148070Available OnlineOverdrive (CMC)

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ils:.b49057339BookBooksEnglishCurrent, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC[2015]viii, 294 pages ; 24 cm
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overdrivecmc:ODN0002148070eBookeBookEnglish20151 online resource

scoping_details_bemis

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